Jodie Foster Discusses Male Gaze’s Effects On Cinema: “Audiences are Missing Out On A Full Experience”

Jodie Foster headlines Hotel Artemis, her first feature starring role since 2013’s Elysium. Along with that tidbit, here’s a more interesting fact – in her 52 plus years of acting, she’s only worked with one female director in cinema. Click on the Foster audio below for more details (as well as her thoughts on the dominance of the “male gaze” in filmmaking):

Along with a stellar film career that includes an Oscar winning performances in The Accused and Silence of the Lambs, Jodie Foster has proven to be a first rate storyteller with her directing efforts Little Man Tate, Home for the Holidays, the underrated The Beaver and more recently Money Monster.



During the Hotel Artemis interviews, Foster was asked about the dominance of the male gaze in respect to cinema, and below is her response (the audio version is cleaned up to remove the journalists’ voices talking over Foster – thus the transcript and the audio versions slightly differ).

“It’s true in literature as well. It’s true in all art forms. We’ve had a very narrow idea of what the creative, visual perspective is. And that’s too bad for everyone. That’s too bad for men. That’s too bad for children. That’s too bad for everyone because audiences are missing out on a full experience.

I’ve only worked with one woman director my whole life ( note: Foster is referring to Mary Lambert in the film Siesta) which is crazy. How many movies have I made? It’s crazy. And even though I’ve made a lot of (films featuring) a singular, strong female character who’s taking care of business, I was never directed, in a way, through the lens of the female experience. And when I (directed the Black Mirror episode) Arkangel, I feel like that show in a way really references all of that. This idea of what is that? What is that language?”

Hotel Artemis, co-starring Sterling K. Brown and Dave Bautista, opens nationwide June 8.

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