‘CinemAddicts’ Episode 88: ‘Widows,’ ‘The Clovehitch Killer,’ And ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’

Widows, directed by Steve McQueen and headlined by Viola Davis, is Anderson Cowan’s most anticipated film of this year, so obviously that’s ther lead of our title. But wait, there’s more! I absolutely loved The Clovehitch Killer and this episode features a bit of insight into Anderson’s screenwriting process and his love for the David Lynch flick Wild at Heart!!

Continue reading “‘CinemAddicts’ Episode 88: ‘Widows,’ ‘The Clovehitch Killer,’ And ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’”

CinemAddicts Ep. 86: ‘Hal’ Is A Keeper And Nicolas Cage Goes All Out in ‘Mandy’

Episode 86 of CinemAddicts is a short one, as it clocks it at just under 50 minutes. But thanks to Nicolas Cage’s new film Mandy and the excellent documentary Hal, this installment is worth a listen!

Continue reading “CinemAddicts Ep. 86: ‘Hal’ Is A Keeper And Nicolas Cage Goes All Out in ‘Mandy’”

Sophie Skelton Gives The ‘211’ On Bulgaria And ‘Outlander’ Success

Sophie Skelton, who many know from her work in the critically acclaimed series Outlander, co-stars with Nicolas Cage in the bank heist film 211 (she plays his daughter and Cage stars as the soon to be retired cop). Below is the audio and transcript of my interview with Skelton, as she talked about both projects, her acting background, and love for Audrey Hepburn films!

Continue reading “Sophie Skelton Gives The ‘211’ On Bulgaria And ‘Outlander’ Success”

Nicolas Cage Sleazes It Up In Pulpy Motel Thriller ‘Looking Glass’

When you drink orange juice, do you love a bit of pulp in the liquid, even if that stuff gets stuck between your teeth or leads to a necessary wipe on the mouth? Nicolas Cage’s latest film Looking Glass oozes sleaze from the get go, and while some viewers may become disenchanted with this lurid noir, others will eagerly sink their teeth into another memorable Cage vehicle.

Continue reading “Nicolas Cage Sleazes It Up In Pulpy Motel Thriller ‘Looking Glass’”

‘Mom And Dad’ Infuses Punk Rock Storytelling In A Suburban Nightmare

People love to talk about the power of a perfect pop song, but what about punk? Director Brian Taylor (Crank) has infused his storyteller with no-nonsense adrenalized filmmaking, and while that aesthetic (like punk) has its detractors, the fans willing to enjoy the refreshingly hellish train ride known as Mom and Dad are in for a treat.

Continue reading “‘Mom And Dad’ Infuses Punk Rock Storytelling In A Suburban Nightmare”

Nicolas Cage Is ‘Left Behind’ With Flight Bound Trailer

LEFT BEHIND (Stoney Lake Entertainment)

Nicolas Cage stars in Left Behind, a film based on the bestselling 1995 novel of the same name. The story centers on pilot Ray Steele (Cage) whose jet plane is flying the skies when the Rapture takes place. Yahoo! Movies premiered the trailer today, and you’ll be able to check out the clip at the end of this post.

Nicolas Cage in Left Behind (Stoney Lake Entertainment)Whether or not you’re a huge fan of Cage, it’s hard to deny he’s starred in his share of classics (Raising Arizona, Leaving Las Vegas, Moonstruck, Adaptation). His body of work may seem all over the place (I love his ability to easily move from project to project), but there is a method to the madness. During the Joe press conference (it’s one of Cage’s finest performances, if you haven’t checked it out), he explained why, when it comes to choosing movie roles, he beats to the sound of his own drummer:

“If you look carefully at my filmography, in between my adventure films, there have been a Bad Lieutenantor a World Trade Center or a Lord of War or a Matchstick Men. I want to keep it eclectic. I see myself as a student. I would never consider myself as a master or a maestro and if you take the path of the student, that means you have to try a little bit of everything in the hopes that you’re going to learn something or strike some kind of new note or new sound or expression in the process. I’m not going for grades – I’m going for an education.”

To hear the full audio of Nicolas Cage talking about his acting process, check out the media bar below:

Left Behind, co-starring Chad Michael Murray and Cassi Thomson, opens October 3.

Nicolas Cage Uses Past Mistakes For Inspired “Joe” Journey

Nicolas Cage has received excellent reviews in director David Gordon Green’s evocative drama Joe, a project which features him as the titular ex-convict. Hell bent on staying out of trouble, the kindhearted yet temperamental Joe is pulled back into a life of complication after befriending a 15-year-old boy (Tye Sheridan).

Green wrote Cage a letter expressing his interest in the actor for Joe. Cage then read the script and also perused the novel Larry Brown’s novel. After visiting the filmmaker in Texas for several days and bonding over tacos, it was essentially a done deal.

For Cage, the return to naturalistic acting on Joe was a change of pace from what he describes as a abstract style of Western kabuki acting he applied to his action adventure roles.

Joe (Roadside Attractions, CR: Linda Kallerus)

“I was at this point where I wanted to find a part where I didn’t design the performance,” said the actor, who also did excellent work opposite John Cusack and Vanessa Hudgens in The Frozen Ground. “Whatever mistakes I made in the past, which I won’t go into detail with, I wanted to put them into a character (and give) a portrayal of understanding. Use the mistakes so I wouldn’t have to act so much.”

“When I read the script (for) Joe, I understood why he was in the situations he found himself in,” said Cage. “I understood his need for restraint. I understood the dialogue and so I thought, ‘this is what I’m looking for, I could just be. I could just feel this.”

Nicolas Cage’s first feature film was the 1982 flick Fast Times at Ridgemont High (he is credited as Nicolas Coppola), so one would assume he has tones of great acting advice to offer.

Click on the media bar below to hear Cage explain why putting yourself on video is an important element of the audition process:

 

Joe is now playing in select theaters and is available on iTunes and VOD.

Nicolas Cage Connects Sublime “Joe” With Bruce Lee & Häägan-Dazs!

Based on Larry Brown’s novel of the same name, “Joe” centers on ex-con Joe Ransom (Nicolas Cage), a man who’s trying to stay out of harm’s way. His quick trigger temper, which is usually aimed at police officers or town irritants (Ronnie Gene Blevens), isn’t making that job any easier.

Our protagonist’s solitary life takes a turn for the better, as he befriends a troubled teenager named Gary (Tye Sheridan) who lands a job with Ransom’s tree poisoning crew. Both Cage and Sheridan share an innate chemistry, and the narrative also contains chilling work from novice actor Gary Poulter as Gary’s deadbeat, alcoholic father. Sadly, Poulter died before he could fully appreciate the fruits of his labor.

Joe (Roadside Attractions, CR: Linda Kallerus)

Directed by David Gordon Green (“George Washington,” “Undertow”), the Southern set drama features has Cage approaching his role in a subtle and naturalistic manner. The actor also tried to make his character as real as possible, as he impressed the crew with his handling of a real cottonmouth snake. Cage, in his own eccentric fashion, described the experience as “very calming..and kind of beautiful.”

The highlight from this week’s “Joe” press conference came from an out of left field Nicolas Cage story, in which he attempted to connect a scene from “Joe” with the importance of eating Häägan-Dazs ice cream and watching a Bruce Lee/Chuck Norris action sequence.

For Cage, attempting to link seemingly incongruous elements is a process he gleaned from his father, who spent his career as a professor. “As a result of my relationship with him, sometimes I talk around in circles,” said the actor. “And sometimes I say things that either land or don’t land. Sometimes I say something really succinct.”

To hear Mr. Cage link “Joe” with Bruce Lee, Chuck Norris, his dad, and Häägen-Dazs ice cream, click on the audio below:

“Joe” opens April 11 in theaters and On Demand.